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Dry or Dehydrated Skin? 8 Traits To Differentiate Both!

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I always thought that I suffer from oily skin. When I was a teen I had a couple of pimples and a greasy t-zone that made me believe that I had this skin composition.

Years went by and I  kept on considering my skin oily and therefore I treated it as such. At the age of 24, I realize that my epidermis was changing and it became a bit dry, so I went ahead and got super moisturizing facial care. The results, pimples came back at 25.

After a long period of hesitation, I decided to visit a cosmetologist, and she finally revealed the truth… my skin was dehydrated! Not oily, not dry, but dehydrated. Those endless trips to the coffee machine, those Friday margarita nights, and all that those diet cokes where finally charging a bill. After all, I wasn’t alone, considering that 75 Percent of Americans Are Chronically Dehydrated.

Dehydrated Skin vs Dry Skin

The main difference between these two is the fact that dehydrated skin is a condition while the other is a skin type.

Dehydrated SkinDehydrated skin comes as a result of lack of water in your body. This can happen (to my surprise) to people with all skin complexions, meaning that you can have oily and dehydrated skin at the same time.

Dehydrated skin comes as a result of lack of water in your body. This can happen (to my surprise) to people with all skin complexions, meaning that you can have oily and dehydrated skin at the same time.

Dehydrated skin normally looks dull, with loss of elasticity, and in severe cases with premature wrinkles. A good way to properly tell if your skin is suffering from lack of hydration is practicing the pinch test.

The Pinch Test

  1. Pinch a small amount of skin on your cheek, abdomen, chest, or the back of your hand and hold for a few seconds.
  2. If your skin snaps back, you’re likely not dehydrated.
  3. If it takes a few moments to bounce back, you’re likely dehydrated.
  4. Repeat in other areas if you’d like.

Dry Skin

On the other hand, in dry skin, water is not the root issue. Dry skin is a regular skin type like oily, sensitive, or combined. Normal traits in dry skin include:

  • scaly appearance
  • white flakes
  • redness or irritation
  • increased incidences of psoriasis, eczema, or dermatitis

How To Treat Dry and Dehydrated Skin

Since dry and dehydrated skin are different skin conditions/types, each one of them requires specific treatments.  The following chart will help you determine which ingredient/formula is adequate for each one:

IngredientBest for dry or dehydrated skin?
hyaluronic acidboth: be sure to apply an oil or moisturizers to lock it in
glycerindehydrated
aloedehydrated
honeydehydrated
nut or seed oil, such as coconut, almond, hempdry
shea butterdry
plant oils, such as squalene, jojoba, rosehip, tea treedry
snail mucindehydrated
mineral oildry
lanolindry
lactic aciddehydrated
citric aciddehydrated
ceramideboth: ceramides strengthen the skin’s barrier to help prevent moisture loss

Additional Tips: 

For dehydrated skin, making changes in your diet is a must. Try drinking at least 2 liters of water per day, and include water-rich fruits and veggies in your diet.  If you practice any sports or physical activities, your water intake needs to increase up to 3.5 liters depending on transpiration.

For dry skin, moisturizing is key. Try using a good quality facial cream to seal your natural face oils, and try including healthy fats like nuts, avocado, and fatty fish in your diet. Wearing a gel mask over-night can also be a good way to boost your glow.

Do you have dry skin or dehydrated, and how do you treat your skin? Let us know in the comments below. 

At Rehealth, we believe that having informed patients is the only way to deliver optimal healthcare. Visit our website to find out more interesting content and be a part of an amazing health integrated community!

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